E Pluribus Mores

Archive for April, 2011|Monthly archive page

Basic Plate

In slow cooking on April 3, 2011 at 11:33 am

This dish brings together a number of our favorite dishes.  It was inspired by a standard from the famed, now defunct Savory Thymes.

Ingredients

1 ½ cup of long grained brown rice

2 packages of firm tofu

Canola oil

¼ cup soy sauce

1 T. brewer’s (nutritional) yeast

1 bunch of red or swiss chard

1 can great northern or white beans

Olive oil

1 small onion

3 cloves garlic

Fresh thyme

1/cup tahini

2 T. each of red and white miso

2 T. rice wine vinegar

Salt and pepper

Step 1  Prep the greens and begin to cook the brown rice. When the brown rice is cooked, set aside.

Step 2  Prepare the miso-tahini sauce: In a blender combine ¼ cup tahini, 2 T. each of red and white miso, 1 T. of olive oil or toasted sesame seed oil, 3 T. of tamari or soy sauce a splash of rice wine vinegar, and ¼ cup water.  Set aside.

Step 3 Cook the tofu: Fry the tofu in 2 T. of canola oil.  When the tofu begins to brown on each side, add 1 T. of soy sauce and stir vigorously.  When the soy sauce has been absorbed, turn off heat.  Add 1 T. of brewer’s yeast and stir.  Leave the tofu in the pan and set aside.

Step 4  Cook the beans: Fry the onion in 2 T. of olive oil.  When the onions start to brown add the garlic and 2-3 sprigs of fresh Thyme.  When the garlic begins to brown add 1 can of white or great northern beans.  Simmer for 3-5 min.  Add salt to taste and lots of black pepper.

Step 5 Cook the greens: As you leave the beans to simmer, heat 1 T. of olive oil and immediately add the chard.  Place a lid on the pan and let steam.  Meanwhile reheat the tofu and occasionally stir the white beans.  The goal is to have the beans, greens, and tofu all hot when served.  When the greens have wilted, splash with rice wine vinegar and serve.

Variation:

Instead of tofu, substitute Pepper and Sesame Encrusted Mahi.  Wash mahi (you could substitute tuna, salmon, or even catfish) and cut into thick strips.  Combine on a plate 1-2 T. of coarsely ground fresh black pepper, 1-2 T. of raw sesame seeds, and salt to taste.  Coat the fish in the mixture and fry in 1-2 T. olive oil until the sesame seeds begin to brown on each side.  If you prefer the mahi more or less rare, adjust the thickness of the slices.

“Slow cooking is something that should be done with passion, between good friends, and use lots of olive oil.”

–The Knucklehole

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